Published: June 8, 2009
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LET'S ASK THE INSIDER...
DAVID MOORE

Meet the South African creator of custom made and extravagant entertainment filled with passion, excitement, glamour and style. His productions, under the umbrella of Moore Entertainment, have sparkled around the world from Korea to Lebanon, from the U.S.A. to Hong Kong. From concept to curtain up, Moore Entertainment retain hands on control of all the varied aspects and details that are necessary to present a great show and has a creative team covering choreography, wardrobe, scenery, lighting & special effects.
We interviewed SBF Member David to find out what it takes to direct & produce a show, such as Crescendo at the Benidorm Palace...
David Moore

  • Quote ...there are many young talented and inventive choreographers and designers that are changing live entertainment. I am very privileged to have some super talents like that in my creative team. It is really important that people like that should be encouraged to ensure the survival of a possible dying art form...
    Where are you originally from?
    David Moore: I am a French citizen, but I was born and educated in South Africa. I come from a small town in the wheat growing regions of the country. My interests in the theatre took me to the University of Pretoria where I obtained a degree in theatre arts.
  • How old were you when you started dancing and what inspired you to take it up?
    DM: My first job was with PACT ballet (one of the national ballet companies). I was still at high school and working part time as an usher at the Civic Theatre in Johannesburg and dancing in several opera and ballet productions. Some wonderful teachers and choreographers encouraged and inspired me and gave me great opportunities.
  • How & when did you make the transition into directing & producing shows?
    Moore Entertainment - logo DM: I always knew that I wanted to create shows. My partner, Emyleen Jones and I worked at the Lido as principals and adagio team. At the end of my contract I decided to say goodbye to performing and with the help of my friend Pierre Rambert (now artistic director of the Lido) I bought all the costumes of Charly Henchis (director of Casino du Liban- Beirut, Dunes - Las Vegas, Casino de Paris). With this treasure chest in hand, I started working as choreographer, director and later producer.
  • What brought you to Spain?
    DM: I had worked at the Benidorm Palace with my partner, Emyleen in the late 1970's. We had also worked for Miss Bluebell at the Scala in Barcelona. Years later the Benidorm Palace contacted me to create a few tableaux for them. One thing lead to another and here I am again. In fact I have relocated our workshops to Spain. It is just more practical.
  • How long have you been producing shows in Benidorm and how often do you create a new one?
    DM: Crescendo is the fifth show that I have created for the Benidorm Palace. Generally the shows run just over one year.
David Moore & Emyleen Jones, 1979
  • What productions do you currently have running?
    DM: Crescendo is at the Benidorm Palace. We are going into rehearsals for a French revue show with a cast of 38 that will tour China in the summer. The Secrets de Champagne will re-open in September - it is a dinner show with and about champagne.
  • What is involved in creating a new production?
    DM: Concept is very important to me. I do not ever want to do shows that just consist of a series of dance routines - the audience should not be under-estimated. I try to devise shows where design, choreography, music and costume all form one integral part of the end product. Each element is inextricably related to the other. At the Benidorm Palace the challenge is different. You have to incorporate Spanish dancing and Flamenco into the production and cater for all ages and all nationalities.
  • How do you audition a cast for a new show?
    DM: It really depends on the show, the venue and the concept. As an example - for a new production at the Benidorm Palace I have to retain a very high standard of Spanish dancing. There will always be at least 12 Spanish dancers in the company of 36 dancers. I have to hunt for two different types of performers.
  • How have productions evolved since you were a performer yourself?
    DM: I often look at present shows and think that I would have loved to have done some of this work. Dancers have so many more challenges offered to them. Yes, there are some show creators that have not evolved with the change of tastes and demands of the general public. But there are also so many young talented and inventive choreographers and designers that are changing live entertainment. I am very privileged to have some super talents like that in my creative team. It is really important that people like that should be encouraged to ensure the survival of a possible dying art form.
Quote ...the audience should not be under-estimated. I try to devise shows where design, choreography, music and costume all form one integral part of the end product...
  • Do you think that the way showbiz is today puts more (or less) pressure on a dancer's career than it used to do in the past and what would you say to encourage today's performers?
    DM: There is a lot more pressure, but there are also a lot more opportunities. You just have to work at your craft, remain focused and be ambitious.
  • Would you like to share with all ShowBiz Friends a memorable moment in your career that you treasure dearly?
    DM: I had seen Emyleen Jones as featured adagio dancer in a show called Follies Spectacular. Unrealistically, I dreamt of partnering this very special and talented lady. Exactly a year later Wendy de la Harpe (choreographer and now director of Idaho Ballet) brought us together. We worked together all over the world as adagio act for over 15 years.
  • Lastly, what is your honest opinion about ShowBiz Friends?
    DM: GREAT idea! The site is well structured and full of wonderful information. Bravo!

    Thanks David for giving us this great interview & break a leg with Crescendo!